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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 93-98

Neonatal and early infancy burns in the only referral Burn center in Northeast of Iran: Report of a decade


1 Surgical Oncology Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
2 Department of Social Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
3 Student Research Committee, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Majid Khadem-Rezaiyan
Department of Social Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijb.ijb_27_18

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Background: Burn in the neonatal and early infancy period (<6 months of age) is a relatively rare accident, but it can cause severe problems. This study is designed to evaluate the epidemiology and etiology of burn injury in neonatal and early infancy period. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we collected information about neonatal and early infancy burn injuries from the hospital information system in a 10-year period starting from January 1, 2007, in Imam Reza Hospital in the northeast of Iran. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16. Results: There were 3 neonatal and 47 early infancy burn injuries (0.7% of all burn injury admissions). All injuries occurred at home. The mean age was 122.3 ± 51.7 days and 31 (62%) were males. The mean percentage of burn total body surface area (TBSA) was 19.21 ± 11.44 (range = 3–55). Mean of hospital stay was 11.9 ± 7.5 days. The fatality rate was 2%. The most common mechanisms of burn injury were scald (41, 82%) and flame (5, 10%). The most common hot liquid containers were kettle (21, 42%) and samovar (8, 16%). Explosion (28.50 ± 2.12) had caused the longest hospital stay (P = 0.01). Patients burnt by hot liquid splashed from samovar had a more burnt TBSA (30.13 ± 10.71) (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Hot beverages and food preparation simultaneous with child care are dangerous conditions which can cause burn injury in infants and neonates. The results of this study set a valuable background for running some prevention programs to prevent neonates and infants from burn injury.


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