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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 1: The use of fasciocutaneous flaps in burn scars. (a) A young adult sustained electrical injury, which exposed his polytetrafluoroethylene bypass graft from the left subclavian to the axillary artery. A 1:3 ratio fasciocutaneous flap was marked on the lateral trunk to cover the defect. (b) Sixth day postoperative result showing the vascular graft is well covered and the donor defect has been closed primarily. A slight violet discoloration of an edge of the flap is seen due to design constraint from another electrical burn in the region of the proposed flap. There was no flap loss and the wounds healed well

Figure 1: The use of fasciocutaneous flaps in burn scars. (a) A young adult sustained electrical injury, which exposed his polytetrafluoroethylene bypass graft from the left subclavian to the axillary artery. A 1:3 ratio fasciocutaneous flap was marked on the lateral trunk to cover the defect. (b) Sixth day postoperative result showing the vascular graft is well covered and the donor defect has been closed primarily. A slight violet discoloration of an edge of the flap is seen due to design constraint from another electrical burn in the region of the proposed flap. There was no flap loss and the wounds healed well